THE BOMBAST STORY

Marked by our engagement with the modernist legacy, the Bombast product line could best be understood as the material trace of what is in many ways a very personal learning curve. Suffice it to say that when we began in this business, we were too young and too inexperienced to know that our dream — participation in a global design culture — was “impossible” from the relative isolation that is our Vancouver home. That we are still at it remains a function of our unwillingness to accept the obvious.

Over and against a globalized system of design and manufacture that has relegated most of us to the status of mere consumer, we have attempted to assert the value of our own experience. In a world dominated by the mediated image, by global capital that has little interest or sensitivity to the particulars of local experience, Bombast is about bringing the great world closer (by engaging with History) while simultaneously asserting the textures and experience of our own lives.

Which might just be a bombastic way of saying we make things for use in a cultural/social context where making is not the primary concern of our fellow citizens.

Our challenge has been to work against the obvious trends in the North American marketplace — by which we mean the shift towards off-shore, volume producers for a mass market characterized by increasingly anonymous, increasingly placeless, consumers. To survive in such a context, we have had to partner with other, like-minded, producers; we have had to conjure up, out of the relatively “thin” ground that is Canadian design history, a “pre-text” for our own production. Through it all we remain committed to the idea that it matters that the objects in our lives tell meaningful stories.


Picture left: BOMBAST’s Riemerschmid sofa in Canada House, London.